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Forward DNS Mappings


  1. Sign in to the Client Portal.
  2. Open the Manage mega menu.
  3. Click Forward DNS / Reverse DNS under the Combined Functions heading.
  4. Click the Forward DNS Records tab.

  Forward DNS Records List

By default the Forward DNS Records list will show all records. Use the Search field to narrow down the result. Know that Verified Status, Domain, and Record Type columns are sortable.

Available Actions

There are three (3) available actions:

  1. Add Forward DNS. Click Add Forward DNS, located above the list to add a new forward DNS record. A popup menu will open:
    • Select a domain from your domain list.
    • Select DNS Record Type. For further information about DNS Record types follow this link.
    • Enter DNS Record Details:

      • Name. You manually enter name as desired.
      • Record type-specific options. Different type of DNS Records will provide various record-specific options. See the Supported Forward DNS Record Types and Their Respective Record Values section below.
      • DNS Time to Live Value. Enter a value in the appropriate field and select a time unit from the drop-down menu.

Under the Manage column you will find two links:

  1. Actions.
    • Delete. Deleting a DNS record will delete all associated Forward DNS records.
    • Modify. Click this link to modify an existing Forward DNS record.
  2. More Details. Open the More Details link in order to get a list of all the external details that are not listed in the table.

Supported Forward DNS Record Types and Their Respective Record Values

You can add eight (8) different types of DNS records:

  1. A/AAAA Address (Host) Record. These records specify the IP address (IPv4 or IPv6) for a given host and points to that IP address. Useful to use if you have sub-domains residing on various systems.
    • Name. A record name is composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 characters. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • IP Address (v4/v6) or Add IP. Enter an IP address of the FQDN. A valid IP address consists of a four octet 32-bit address. Use a comma to separate multiple entries. If you choose the Add IP option, specify Node, Device, and IP.
    • Select Pointer (PTR) Record Creation.
      1. Create PTR Records. PTR Records created if there are no existing records associated to the IP Addresses added.
      2. Always Create PTR Records. PTR Records created regardless of existing records associated to the IP Addresses added.
      3. Do Not Create PTR Records.
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

    Example Domain: domain.com
    Sample Format:IN A 69.9.64.11
    Where:1. IN indicates Internet
    2. A indicates record type
    3. 69.9.64.11 indicates the IP address of domain.com

  2. CNAME (Canonical Name Record). Use to make domains and sub-domains an alias of another domain. It ties a host name to an A record. With a CNAME record, instead of making several A records, you can create one record and point them to one A record. The advantage of this approach is that when you need to change the IP address, all you need to do is change the A record's IP address.
    • Name. A record name is composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 characters (a-z, A-Z, 0-9 and hyphens '-'). Labels may not start or end with a hyphen. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Alias. Enter a domain to be tied to an A record.
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

    Example Domain:mail.something.com
    Sample Format:IN CNAME mail.something.net
    Where:1. IN indicates Internet
    2. CNAME indicates record type

  3. MX (Mail Exchanger Record). Use to specify to which mail servers should emails be routed to. The MX DNS record needs a priority value as a part of its entry - it sets the priority of a target host.
    • Name. The Record Name must be composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 characters. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Mail Exchange Server. Enter mail server name.
    • Priority. Enter a numerical value between 0 and 65535 indicating the priority level assigned to a server. Lower value means that a server is more preferred.
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

    Example Domain:thisdomain.com
    Sample Format:thisdomain.com. 14400 IN MX 0 thisdomain.com.
    1. This record shows that all mail @ thisdomain.com should be routed to the mail server at thisdomain.com.
    2. The number zero (0) indicates the priority level.
    3. Make sure that there is a dot at the end of the domain name in the MX record. If the dot is absent, emails are routed to "thisdomain.com.thisdomain.com".

  4. TXT (Text Record). Use to insert any text-based information that can be called upon when necessary. Most commonly it is used to verify domain ownership and is used to implement SPF.
    • Name. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Text. A text-string which is to be passed in to the TXT record. Enter up to 4,000 characters. Apostrophes and dollar symbols "$" are not allowed.
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

    Example Domain:example.com
    Sample Format:example.com. TXT @ "Random text"
    Where:1. TXT indicates record type
    2. @ indicates record name. (In this case it is blank, which is indicated by @.)
    3. "Random text" indicates the arbitrary text entered in the record.

  5. LOC (Location Record). Use the LOC record to specify geographical location information of a domain.
    • Name. A Record Name must be composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 Characters. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Geographic Location Text. Specify a geographical location.
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

    Example Domain:mydomain.com
    Sample Format: mydomain.com. LOC 52 14 05 N 00 08 50 E 10m
    Where:1. LOC indicates record type
    2. 52 14 05 N 00 08 50 E 10m indicates the geographical location.

  6. NS (Name Server Record). Use to specify an authoritative name server for a given host.
    • Name. The Record Name must be composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 characters. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Name Server. The Name Server is composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 characters. The entire value must not exceed 253 ASCII character length. Empty spacing and asterisks "*" are not allowed.
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

    Example Domain:example.com
    Sample Format:example.com. IN NS ns1.phoenixnap.com.
    Where:1. IN indicates Internet
    2. NS indicates record type
    3. ns1.phoenixnap.com. is the authoritative server for the domain example.com

  7. SPF (Sender Policy Framework Record). The values of a SPF record specify what servers are allowed to legitimately use your domain name for the sending of emails. This serves as an email-validation record system designed to detect email spoofing.
    • Name. A Record Name must be composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 characters. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Rule. Enter up to 4,000 characters. Apostrophes (") are not allowed (e.g. v=spf1 -all).
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

      Example Domain:example.com
      #1 Sample Format:mydomain.com. TXT "v=spf1 -all"
      Clarification:This is the simplest possible SPF record. It means the domain example.com never sends mail. This would make sense to have if the domain never sends emails.
      #2 Sample Format:TXT "v=spf1 mx -all"
      Clarification:Designate MX servers, as they do send mail.
      #3 Sample Format:mydomain.com. TXT "v=spf1 mx ptr -all"
      Clarification:This designates all of the hosts whose PTR hostname matches example.com

  8. SRV (Service Locator Record). Use this to provide information on available services. For example, given a known domain name, you can define the port and hostname for a given service.
    • Name. A Record Name must be composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 characters. The entire record name must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Host Name. The system which receives the service. This Host Name is composed of a series of parts called labels delimited with dots '.'. Each label can contain up to 63 Characters. ‘*’ and empty spacing between characters are forbidden. The entire value must not exceed 253 ASCII character length.
    • Priority. A numerical value between 0 and 65535 indicating the priority level assigned to the host. Lower values give higher priority (zero (0) gives highest priority).
    • Weight. A numerical value between 0 and 1410065407 which is to be used as a load balancing mechanism.
    • Port. Enter a numerical value between 0 and 65535. This is the actual port number of the service in offer.
    • TTL. The DNS Time to Live must be greater than 0 and must not exceed 2,147,483,647 seconds.

    Example Domain:somedomain.com
    Sample Format: _service._proto.name. TTL class SRV priority weight port target.
    Where:1. "service" is the symbolic name of the desired service
    2. "proto" is the transport protocol of the desired service. This is usually TCP or http.
    3. "name" is the domain for which this service is valid. (Ending with a dot.)
    4."TTL" is time to live
    5. "class" is always IN
    6. "priority" indicates the priority level of the target host. Lower value equals greater importance.
    7. "weight" is used when more than one service has same priority. A higher value gives greater importance.
    8. "port" is the port number of the service in question.
    9. "target" The name of the host that will provide this service. Does not have to be in the same zone (domain).


DNS record value specifies where you want to point your record, or in some cases what you want to do with it. These values vary in type, depending on DNS record type.

 Same as Zone

Uncheck 'Same as Zone' if name differs from My Domain. If same as zone, "@" will indicate record name.

Time to Live Value (TTL)

For the TTL, enter a numerical value of how long a DNS record will be cached before it needs to be refreshed. The default value for TTL is 3600 seconds, but you can enter any value greater than zero (0) and specify it in seconds, minutes, hours, or days. Any changes you make to the value of a DNS record will take place in the specified time to live period. (e.g. If you make a change to a DNS record and the TTL is set to 600 seconds, it will take that time until the new information is in effect.)